Article 6

Title

Competitive Public Procurement during COVID-19: The Unique Political and Policy Experience of the United States

Author

  • Clifford McCue – [email protected]
    Ph.D. from Florida International University in 1997. Dr. McCue conducts research and teaches a wide variety of courses in public budgeting, financial management, public policy, and public procurement. As an international consultant and regular presenter at professional conferences, Dr. McCue has focused his research on numerous aspects of public procurement. His current research agenda examines the intersection of professionalization and public administration, including examination of the social and institutional barriers to enhancing accountability, sustainability, and good governance in public procurement.
  • Emily Boykin – [email protected]
    Doctoral student in the Reubin O’D. Askew School of Public Administration and Policy at Florida State University in Tallahassee, Florida. She holds a B.A. in Political Science from the University of Florida. Her current research interests are in public procurement, public budgeting and finance, and policy.
  • Eric Prier – [email protected]
    Received his Ph.D. Political Science in 1997 from Florida State University. Professor Prier conducts research and teaches a variety of courses in Political Economy, Research Methods, and Public Policy at Florida Atlantic University. As an international consultant and regular presenter at professional conferences, Dr. Prier has focused his scholarship on numerous aspects of public procurement. The former Senior Research Scholar at Florida Atlantic University’s Public Procurement Research Center, his current research agenda examines the intersection of political economy, organization theory, supply chain management, and the barriers to accountability, sustainability, and good governance in public procurement.

 

Abstract

COVID-19 appeared during one of the most turbulent political environments in U.S. history. This research documents how political polarization during a presidential election year coincided with an incoherent national policy and procurement response to the COVID-19 pandemic, and empirically examines the competitive nature of pandemic-related public procurement contracts across the 50 states based on partisan control of state governments.

 

Keywords

Disaster Spending; Partisan Politics; Public Procurement; Full and Open Competition